Archive | 2012

Is there a farmland bubble?

The Los Angeles Times came out with a story this morning about a recent surge in farmland prices. According to the Times, more and more investors are swooping in and gobbling up California farmland– including in the Central Valley– Contributing to a spike in land prices. Coupled with increasing Chinese demand for American produce as […]

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Brookings: Stockton 17th in country for “recovery performance”

The Brookings Institution has released their Metro Monitor update for December 2012, and the data for the Stockton region is mixed. As mentioned before on this site, Brookings uses employment, economic output and housing data to determine which cities are recovering fastest in relation to the worst of the recession. In September’s Metro Monitor, Stockton […]

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What can be done to stop absentee landlords?

Yesterday, Councilman Paul Canepa suggested that absentee landlords are the driving force behind deteriorating neighborhood conditions. And at first glance, he makes a good point. “When you have people who don’t care about neighborhoods, they’re renting to people and they don’t see what’s going on, it’s the main root of the problem,” said Canepa, quoted […]

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Tuesday notes: Dameron, Dan Cort, and the waterfront

Happy Tuesday, everyone. No new content today, though some interesting news and notes caught my attention in the last week that I think deserve some attention:

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The right way to develop Stockton’s waterfront

Mike Fitzgerald had a great column yesterday lamenting the fact that Stockton has turned its back on its waterfront land. I couldn’t agree more. Our geographic location on the Delta provides a tremendous opportunity to truly distinguish Stockton from other Central Valley cities. But there was one portion of the column in particular that grabbed […]

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Sequestration in the City: How the impending “fiscal cliff” could harm development at the local level

Last week, the country reelected President Barack Obama, and before the confetti could even hit the floor, the attention turned to the next hurdle looming for our lawmakers: the fiscal cliff. On January 2nd, deep cuts to the federal government are slated to go into effect unless Congress can agree on a deal to avoid […]

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The limits of density in Stockton

As you probably know, this site advocates for smart growth policies to help address the issues facing the city. A key aspect of smart growth is managing density, and on the surface, the city of Stockton has not planned very well in this regard. Specifically, Stockton has experienced an incredible proliferation of low density single […]

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Smart growth: the ultimate bipartisan issue

Today, citizens will head to the polls to vote on the future of the country, state, and city. Throughout this campaign season, there have been many issues that have proven to be divisive, providing a clear contrast between candidates and political parties. But some issues and policies transcend ideology, garnering bipartisan support. The way we […]

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Project Ceasefire: Understanding Stockton’s new crime fighting initiative

On Tuesday, the city council voted to implement a crime fighting strategy known as Project Ceasefire in an effort to combat against Stockton’s rising violent crime. Faced with dwindling resources and increasingly fearless criminals, Stockton’s police department has been overwhelmed. Could Project Ceasefire– a program that has shown great success in other cities and even […]

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Brookings: Stockton ranks 37th in the country for recovery performance

Good economic news is tough to find these days in Stockton. Unemployment, while receding, remains excruciatingly high, the housing industry is stagnant, and, lest we forget, the city is trudging its way through bankruptcy. Judging by these factors, Stockton is mired squarely in the doldrums, so much so that our Bakersfield neighbors to the south […]

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